Cream of Dallas Ad Agencies – Moving Brands Forward

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The life of a social media influencer

Today the world of social media seems to be at an all-time high. With people reportedly checking their phones up to 50+ times a day, social media use is continuing to rapidly grow. With the top platforms being YouTube, Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram, people with a large number of followers have either accidently or purposefully found themselves in a booming market. These people I’m referring to are social media influencers. It is the job that basically everyone wants, not only because you are sent a bunch of free stuff (think endless designer handbags and clothes), but also because you enter a landscape of endless business opportunities. Nowadays, brands are reaching out to influencers like never before in an effort to raise awareness for themselves and increase sales. A single post from an influencer can help a brand that no one has heard of become the next BIG thing. To have that much leverage is truly a crazy thing and something that companies and brands all over the world are realizing and capitalizing upon.

While there are an abundance of influencers, ranging from YouTube stars to Instagram “celebrities”, what separates big time influencers from smaller ones? As an avid follower of many famous Instagram bloggers, I have always wondered how one grows to be one of the big time influencers. Luckily, I was able to get some of my questions answered when I got to meet Cassie Freeman known for her blog, Hi Sugarplum. With an impressive Instagram following of 90.6K, in addition to followers that strictly just read her blog, I was able to find out what a big time influencer like Cassie does in a day and how she got started. How did I get to meet Cassie you might be wondering? Well, luckily I was given the opportunity to join greenlight’s director of brand experience, Alex Baker on a promotional video shoot for Inwood Village, which involved both Cassie and her adorable daughter, Sloane. While taking a break for lunch, I was able to ask Cassie about the start of her Instagram and blogging career. Not to my surprise, Cassie said that she first started Hi Sugarplum right when blogs started to become popular, making it a perfect example of right place and right time. Cassie says that she first started it as a hobby, which seems to be true for other lifestyle bloggers I follow, and then before she knew it her blog began to pick up traction and popularity. Soon, Cassie said she found herself having to fully commit her time and energy into her blog and Instagram.

Cassie is a lifestyle blogger, which means you will find her posting about outfit ideas, dinner recipes for the family, and anything in-between. One thing I asked Cassie was how she determines what to post each day, and what posts are most popular. Fashion she said always receives good feedback, partially because people can easily shop an outfit she posts by the direct links she uses, whether it’s for a whole outfit or just a piece of one. This direct linkage is a crucial part of an influencer’s income as the links they post lead to the influencer receiving a monetary percentage of the item posted if one of their followers makes a purchase. Sounds like the life of an influencer is amazing, right? Well it can be, but it can also be hectic and can take just as much or even more time than a regular 9am-5pm job. According to Cassie, a lot of time goes into coming up with content and sometimes it can feel overwhelming, especially when there is a constant pressure to keep your audience engaged. One has to have a good eye and endless amount of ideas for posts that will keep both current followers interested, but also attract new followers. This can be a difficult job; however, with it comes some amazing opportunities and business ventures. Aside from the video that Cassie was participating in for Inwood Village, she has also recently collaborated on her own Gibson x Hi Sugarplum collection, which is available at Nordstrom. Talk about an incredible business partnership! Now although I would probably love being a lifestyle blogger as much as the next girl, I think I’m much better at reading and following content than creating it, so for now I’ll stick to that.

Till next time!

-Myla (Account Service Intern)

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The Road to Erin

For my first internal journal entry, I want to share a bit of my journey to this career path. First things first, I’m Erin, the creative intern this summer. I was born and raised in the Dallas area, Mesquite more specifically. I’m a senior at UT Arlington majoring in Visual Communications. I have a pretty decent collection of funko pop figurines and I live for true crime podcasts.

After graduating high school, I went to Texas Tech to study Media and Communications in hopes of becoming an audio engineer and working with music. My dream was to be the person that picked soundtracks and junk for TV. Not really sure where that dream came from but I ran with it for a minute. After the first month of living in Lubbock I was just done. The dust storms and the absolute lack of civilization beyond campus was driving me crazy and I decided I needed to transfer. Not to mention the fact that my major was essentially broadcasting and I was quickly depleting the little bit of college fund I had. Second semester I started making plans to transfer. When I made that decision, I picked UTA because they had an audio engineering program and I was still sticking with that. I got accepted, my credits transferred, all that jazz. Then I realized the audio engineering program was a part of the music school and not only required an audition but a performance element. Now, I did play trumpet for 6 years, but I was far from impressive at it. That was the final nail in the audio engineering coffin.

Come August, I started at UTA as an undeclared sophomore. I was getting through my basics but still had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. I had too many credit hours to still be undeclared and I was panicking. So, I did what any 19 year old would do, I ran to my mom for help. We looked over all the majors UTA had because I was not about to go through transferring again. She found VC and told me to check it out. I read the description and it sounded fine, but I was out of time, so I ran with it. From then on, I was hooked.

Prior to this I had never really considered myself an artistic person. I had a decently lucrative business for 2 years in high school where I made duct tape wallets and sold them for $5 (I had business cards and everything), other than that I had no real experience. Starting with absolutely no knowledge of Illustrator or Photoshop was daunting to say the least. Not only that, but I couldn’t really draw, still can’t honestly. All of these things made me seriously question this career path more times than I can even count, mostly because I just felt like I sucked. There was just something about it that kept calling me back. I just wanted to keep learning as much as I could about everything that even remotely pertained to graphic design. So, instead of continuing to suck, I decided I wanted to be good. I asked for advice and kept pushing myself to be a better artist. It helped that I really loved learning about this stuff.

Interning at greenlight has really helped to solidify that this is what I want to be doing. Everything I’ve worked on so far has been a blast. Making badass beer cans and cute little illustrations of tents doesn’t feel like work for me, it just feels like fun. More than that, I feel lucky to be able to work with some really awesome artists and I look forward to continue learning from these super rad people. I’m forever grateful for this opportunity and I’m super glad to be here this summer.

Thanks for reading :) -Erin

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Sweet Experiences

Experience, the word that almost every company or brand is using at the moment. While this word is not new, it seems to have taken on a new meaning of its own recently, one that has been transforming the way brands interact with consumers and specifically, what it means to go to a museum or art exhibit. Nowadays, people are flocking to new pop-up exhibits, where both entire buildings and small spaces are being used to transport a visitor into a new world, whether that world be a galactic wonderland or a candy lover’s dream. Inside these spaces, artists and collaborators come together to create a unique environment and experience for their audience, which most of the time involves some sort of interaction with the art. For example, in the Meow Wolf installation, located in my hometown of Santa Fe, NM, people can expect to be taken to a trippy, dream-like world where entering a refrigerator is one of the many ways to enter a new part of the exhibit. Walls glow in the dark, and in the center of the exhibit is a collection of tree houses, some of which have brightly colored mushrooms that make noise if you hit them. Sounds weird, I know… however, these types of interactions that one has with the exhibit are what make it so interesting and intriguing to people. I believe that part of the growing appeal of these installations is that it can entertain all ages with different mindsets. These types of experiential art exhibits are not based on demographics, but instead focus on psychographics. Not only can a five-year-old boy find enjoyment from these exhibits, but a seventy-five-year-old grandmother can too.

Recently, I have been lucky enough to experience another interactive exhibit in my other home of Dallas. Recognizing the trend in the industry (as well as just finding it cool and wanting to see it in person and get the perfect Instagram pic) greenlight provided the agency the opportunity to experience the Sweet Tooth Hotel. This “hotel” is a 1,200 square foot experiential art exhibit located in Victory Park. The interactive space takes you into a world where each room is transformed into a place that looks like a mix between Alice in Wonderland, Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory, and the Candy Land board game. Throughout the space, you will find that each room is different than the previous, but still has the same sugar filled theme that is seen in every corner. I don’t want to give too much away, but expect to find life-sized bedside tables that resemble macaroons and massive donuts wedged into walls. Not to mention, there are also some real sweet treats that you can actually indulge in. Needless to say, the experience was a sweet one!

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A Brand’s Personality: My Introduction to Archetypes

Hi there! For whoever may be reading this, let me introduce myself. I’m Myla, the new account service intern. Some quick facts about me are that I am from Santa Fe, New Mexico (and for those of you who are wondering, no, I unfortunately do not speak Spanish), I am a rising senior at SMU, majoring in strategic brand management and minoring in graphic design, and I have a passion for trashy television, specifically, anything and everything on Bravo. And yes, those of you who hate trashy television like my father, you are allowed to roll your eyes at me.

As for my experience at greenlight so far, it has been nothing short of welcoming and amazing. Even though I have only been at the agency for one week now, I can confidently say that I have never felt more welcomed by a group of people. So far, one of my favorite parts of the week has been a meeting that I had with Todd, the chief creative officer at greenlight on the topic of archetypes and how the agency uses them to understand and help a client’s brand.

Prior to the meeting, I did not know exactly what an archetype was and what they were used for. The official definition is, “a very typical example of a certain person or thing”. At greenlight, archetypes are used to find out a brand’s personality. There are twelve archetypes, which include: The Innocent, The Sage, The Explorer, The Rebel, The Magician, The Hero, The Lover, The Jester, The Everyman, The Caregiver, The Ruler, and The Creator. The archetypes are broken into four different categories that classify them by what they provide people or want to invoke. The Creator, The Ruler and the Caregiver are in the group of providing stability and control. The Innocent, The Sage, and The Explorer are in the group of independence and fulfillment. The Rebel, The Magician, and The Hero are in the group of Risk and Mastery. Lastly, The Lover, The Jester, and The Everyman are in the group of providing belonging and enjoyment.

One vital piece of information that Todd shared with Erin (the creative intern) and me was that while some brands might be a combination of two archetypes, the strongest brands usually stick to one archetype. An archetype can help a brand realize what their voice, tone and personality should be like. For example, Apple is The Creator archetype. The Creator archetype is known to be innovative, imaginative and to produce things that have value. The voice of Apple is one that is inspiring and sparks change. A classic example of this is their tagline, Think Different or their famous 1984 super bowl ad that notably never shows the computer, but instead uses a dramatic scene to provoke a feeling of excitement. In addition, Apple as a brand wants to provide a sense of stability and control. For other brands, such as, Ford, they want to appeal to everyone, hence why they are considered The Everyman archetype.

I think that the use of Archetypes is both smart and interesting, and definitely sets greenlight apart from other agencies when it comes to strategy, design, marketing, and branding. It makes sense to analyze and strategically think about a brand from a point of view that one would use to understand a friend or a human.

Ultimately, brands have human characteristics that they use to connect with consumers. Many people, including myself see their favorite brands as friends. Some of my favorites include Boys and Arrows, Goop, Glossier, Apple, and Free People. We believe in them and trust them like we would with a friend so it only makes sense for a brand to have a consistent personality and voice. It would seem strange if a brand were to one day use a sense of humor to convey a message and another day use a serious tone to express themselves.

Similar to how it would be difficult to build a relationship with someone who seems to have multiple personalities, a brand cannot expect to build trust with a consumer if they are using different personas. Now, thanks to Todd, I can’t help but think about what archetypes fit with brands that I am exposed to daily. In a way, I feel like I am becoming a psychologist on brands. I find myself not only psychoanalyzing The Housewives of New York City, but also the advertisements that stream during commercial breaks. Till next time!

-Myla (Account Service Intern)

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From Why to What

“Why advertising?” The go-to question from any relative, friend, or potential employer asking about my major. This seemingly simple inquiry was a nightmare for me, because there wasn’t really a definitive answer in the beginning. Truth is, I used to want to study theater in college. (Auditioned for the program and everything!) It was the only thing I really enjoyed growing up, but when that didn’t work out, I knew it wasn’t the end of the world. It just meant it was time to find a new passion to study while using the things that theater taught me: how to be creative, how to collaborate with other people, and how to present yourself with confidence. So I found myself in an advertising class freshman year, and the rest is history.

Now that I’m a rising senior, the question is starting to change. It’s no longer “Why” but “What.”

What are you going to do with advertising?” I hate this question for the same reason that I love what I’m studying: there is no set path for me so it’s hard to say. There are so many possibilities that I have no way of knowing which one is my perfect match. Sure, I’m studying brand management, which means I’m probably not going to be an Art Director anytime soon, but it doesn’t necessarily mean I’m going to end up an Account Executive one day either.

I’m a creative person who is not a Creative. While I won’t be making masterpieces in photoshop (although I gave myself a pretty convincing fake tattoo in a creative production class once), I’ve got an interest in writing. And brand strategy and social media allow me to think creatively, along with account service giving me insight on the entire creative process. The small-agency culture at greenlight has given me the chance to really explore these other areas while focusing on account service.

So what do I want to do with advertising? I want to try it all, while I’m still growing up.

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Materializing

For full time ad agency employees, having your work transform from creative concept into a physical material happens pretty often. I’m sure that feeling of holding your work in your hands for the first time never grows dull, but I can imagine the feeling normalizes.

However, for us interns, having work that started from us spit-balling ideas in a brainstorm session turn into printed media was a first.

The job was the Memphis Street Collective – our intern project for the summer. Specifically, the event posters and flyers for the event are what made it to the printer. Truly, the credit for the posters and flyers belongs to Robin, our creative intern, as he designed them. But still, seeing the materialization of a project I had a hand in was a rewarding feeling none-the-less. Seeing Robin’s glowing face when he saw his printed designs was pretty awesome too.

When my time at greenlight has concluded and I reminisce on my intern experience here, the moment that the printing company’s delivery service dropped off the shiny stack of plastic wrapped posters is one I’ll never forget.

-Tristan

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Helping Hands

A significant take-away from my time at greenlight thus far is that you can’t, or at least shouldn’t, do anything alone. I’ve experienced first hand that the more people who can get their hands on a project, the better the final product.

It is my impression that my higher-ups here at greenlight had this in mind when they designed the structure of the internship program - with an account services intern, creative intern, and social media intern. By designating certain categories of responsibilities to each intern, yet having us collaborate on the same projects, it is inevitable that we each add our own special-something to whatever we’re working on.

The Memphis Street Collective is a perfect example of this. Essentially a marketplace-styled event, we interns were given the summer-long project of bringing every aspect of the event to life. From the initial concept, to contacting and coordinating with vendors, to a promotional campaign and everything in between, the project wouldn’t be possible without not only the unique talents that each intern brings to the table, but also the support of everyone within the agency.

At greenlight, nobody is ever expected to do anything all on their own – and that feels good. Truly, it’s a reflection of the culture here. Working in such a supportive environment is not something that I take for granted!

-Tristan

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Time Flies When You're Working Hard

All of the sudden, it’s getting real. There’s only one month left of our internship which means responsibilities have increased (along with stress levels) as we get deep into the execution of our plans for the Memphis Street Collective, our big event and intern project for the summer.

(August 10, by the way. RSVP here >> greenlightad.com/MSC)

Olivia, greenlight’s COO, wants this internship to be a great learning experience for us, and that means learning exactly how the agency works. So no more intern-only meetings and GoogleDocs with our plans. Now, I’m using the proper software and communication methods to get jobs done, like a real part of the agency.

Yesterday I was so busy with meetings and kicking off jobs for this project that I didn’t even have time to go get a free Slurpee on 7/11. But I have no complaints – I actually love being busy! So...I’m either turning into my mother, or this is just part of being a grown-up.

At this rate, the summer will be over before I know it.

-Amy

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greenlight book club

Ah, summer. The perfect time for binge watching your favorite shows on Netflix and reading books for pleasure, since the school year doesn’t really allow for either. I shamefully finished the newest season of “Orange is the New Black” within one week of its release, so I’ve decided to hit the books, and it appears I’m not alone.

Lunchtime at greenlight has turned into reading hour for some. We each finish eating and take to one of the many comfortable corners of the office for some time to ourselves before getting back to work.

This sparked a conversation today: why don’t we have a greenlight book club?

A key skill in advertising, we’ve discussed in my account planning class, is the ability to see things through the perspective of another. (Aside from advertising, it’s just a good life skill, really.) Reading new books is another way opening our eyes to new perspectives, and the book club could be just another way to make the culture at greenlight even closer.

As far as greenlight clubs go, we’ve already got #glXL doing BBG, we’ve got the Beyoncé vs. Taylor Swift rivalries, so why not start a new group to crack open a cold one with the boys book with the agency.

Any suggestions?

-Amy

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Miscellaneous

This is the third summer that I’ve had an internship, and by now, I can state that “miscellaneous” is the name of the internship game.

Each summer, with this one being no exception, I regularly have people ask me what I do for my internship. It is always a loaded question, because the nature of internships is that there is a large array of things that I “do.” Whether it is brainstorming social media posts, planning an event, packaging deliveries, or running any given errand, there is no confining description for the job of an intern.

Prior to having any professional work experience, I think it is a common misconception that your future professional job will be fairly singular in its responsibilities. Throughout my time thus far at greenlight, I can see that not only are internships not singular in tasks, but the jobs of full-time employees are not singular either – regardless of position title. People help out in whatever tasks they can, and do whatever is needed for greenlight to produce the best work possible.

What I’ve come to learn is that there is great value behind the diverse assortment of intern tasks. It allows for exposure to an array of skillsets, and through this, it allows for learning about your own skillsets. At this stage of my pre-career life, that exposure is immensely beneficial.

In reality, “miscellaneous” is fun. It keeps things interesting, and prevents things from feeling stale. I’m grateful for the “miscellaneous.”

Until next time!

-Tristan

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Working Outside the Box

One of my favorite things about greenlight is that you are not confined to your job description. In fact, you are welcome (encouraged, even) to step outside of your box. If you have an idea, say it! Good ideas can come from anywhere. At greenlight, collaboration is essential. As long as you are willing to put in the effort, you can try anything; all you need to do is ask.

This week, our brand strategist, Claire, sent out an agency-wide email inviting us all to join the social media team and each take over posting for a period of time.

As the account services intern, I mostly help with projects for greenlight's current clients. But I also study brand management in school, and I know that keeping up with social media is essential in our ever-changing, digital world. (And let's be honest - it's kinda fun.)

Now, greenlight is not only giving me the experience in account services that I signed up for, but also a chance to try my hand at something that I've always enjoyed. After all, life's too short to do the same thing everyday.

-Amy

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Belong

Sitting across from a strip of dull commercial buildings, there’s a small field next to greenlight where the only color besides green is brought on by a lonely pair of sunflowers. As I pass by every morning, I wonder if those flowers ever feel out of place.

Belonging is a peculiar word. Definition: “be the property of; be a member or part of; be rightly placed in a specified position.”

To most, the idea is to conform – fitting in with the rest of your surrounding. I like to think that “to belong” is to know why you are where you are – to exist with purpose.

Seemingly out of place in a cluster of industrial buildings, there is an ad agency on Memphis Street. Somewhere between Stemmons Freeway and the Trinity River, greenlight has found its home – a flower in a dry field. It doesn’t conform, nor does it fit. It belongs.

I wholeheartedly believe that greenlight will shape this area. Maybe in a few years, life will bring me back to this part of Dallas. By then, I hope to see Memphis Street filled with life, character, passion, art and vision.

For now, it’s pretty dull.

Still, I know I’m exactly where I want to belong:

4827 Memphis Street, Dallas, TX 75207.

-Robin

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Warning or Welcome? A surprise from the greenlight family.

An interesting start to my second week at greenlight, I arrived Monday morning to a surprise on my desk (which I instantly put on my snapchat story, of course): a Nerf gun. I mentioned last week that I’m trying to learn how to #adult, but I think someone here is trying to bring out my inner child. When I said I was battling adulthood, I didn’t mean it this literally.

My logical side tells me that this was just an accident, but I still can’t help but wonder, as I look around every corner while working on the creative brief for our intern project, if I’m about to be a part of a spontaneous, agency-wide Nerf gun war. It may sound crazy, and it would be if this were any other company, but something about greenlight’s culture leads me to believe that this could actually happen.

Not that everyone spends their days goofing off, because I’ve already learned so much about how ad agencies work in my short time here. I only mean to say that the people at greenlight know the perfect balance of work and fun. They are a family (and what family hasn’t had a good, old-fashioned Nerf gun battle?) and it’s something you instantly feel when you enter the office.

This is what I was most looking for in my summer internship: a job that was challenging, but surrounded by fun and supportive people, and I know that I’ve found that here at greenlight.

Wish me luck in case this battle actually happens. In the meantime, back to work.

-Amy

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Go Big

A week ago, if you gave me a map and asked me to locate Dallas, I wouldn’t have the slightest clue. Somewhere in Texas, right? I wanted to go big; a big agency with a big name that could keep up with my big dreams of making it in the world of advertising. Yet, somehow I ended up at greenlight.

I walked past the small cacti decorating the small parking lot, up the small steps and in front of a small building. From outside, everything about this place seemed so small.

One introduction after another, it was more than evident that the people at greenlight were everything but small. Never have I stepped into a building overflowing with such expertise, drive and heart. More importantly for me, they are guiding me in the same path. Every day, I’m encouraged to be curious, to be ambitious, and to be humble – to be always learning.

A week into my internship and I can say for certain: the people at this agency are going to make a big impact in my life.

I can only hope that my work, passion and attitude leave a big dent in theirs.

Go big, or go home.

-Robin

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Amy vs. Adulthood

As a rising senior at SMU, I’ve been avoiding facing adulthood for as long as possible. Refusing to fight the battle, I spent my last two college summers either babysitting or gallivanting around Spain in a “study” abroad trip. My time has come, however, to suit up and join the real world and gain some much needed experience in advertising.

So here’s what we’re gonna do. I’m going to tell you where I’m at now, and then you’re going to check back in on August 10 to see the level of “adult” I have reached.

It’s not like I don’t have a fighting chance, since I’ve been through two years of training in SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute (for which I’m one of the biggest advocates), but this summer at greenlight will be the ultimate test.

Although I’ve done countless exercises of case studies and projects on rebranding, creating and promoting my own event and helping on real accounts in a real Dallas ad agency are some bigger challenges I’ve yet to face. Luckily, I’m surrounded by some pretty cool people to help me in this fight. (I mean, thank God I’ve chosen advertising as my career path, because the agency life that greenlight has shown me so far makes adulthood way less scary than it could be.)

I’m ready. Let’s go.

-Amy

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Week 1 Retrospect

Today marks the end of my first week as an intern here at greenlight. When I reflect on my short time at greenlight thus far, what has impacted me the most is the agency’s character. It’s a synergy of everything greenlight is, from the employees, to the office space, to the mere vibe of the agency.

As someone who has only been immersed in greenlight for a short amount of time, I can already state that greenlight’s culture is an invaluable asset, and is something that distinguishes greenlight from other agencies. After all, the essence of greenlight’s character is what attracted me to pursue an internship here, and it has made my first week better than I could have ever hoped for.

It is not hard to see that the values that encompass greenlight, including passion, creativity, and inclusiveness, manifest into the exceptional work that the agency creates.

I’m so grateful and excited to experience, and hopefully, add to the culture at greenlight this summer.

Join me on my adventure!

-Tristan

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Final Farewell

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Final Farewell

For most, change invokes, however minute or grand, a feeling of anxiousness. When I walked into greenlight’s office on my last day, the anxiousness was nowhere in sight. Of course, it could have been that greenlight is heading into a weeklong holiday break, but I think it’s more the fact that when a place begins to feel like home, that feeling doesn’t ever really go away.

But if there is one thing to thank greenlight for, it’s for reinforcing my desire to take the creative route.

It seems from the moment we learn to speak, we are asked to figure out what we want to do with our lives. It better be practical and it better put food on the table. Even though I’ve been writing since kindergarten, I pushed that passion to the back of my priority list. After all, as many teachers told me, “you’ll never find a good job as a writer.”

I tried to incorporate writing into my education as best as I could. I jumped from journalism, to public relations, and finally found a home in advertising. Even in advertising, though, the unpredictability of a creative career path weighed on me. I told myself I would stick to the business side of the industry, like any practical girl should.

Then came greenlight. While I came to greenlight focused on account service, here and there, I was given creative projects. When I’d go home at the end of those days of writing, they were the days I felt the happiest.

After years of trying to push writing out of my life, greenlight reinstated my passion. And while I’m only as certain about my future career as any 24-year-old can be, I am certain of one thing: I am a writer, down to my bones. And for that, greenlight, I am forever grateful.

While it is strange to know I’ll take all of my belongings with me when I leave greenlight for the last time, it is calming to know that I’ve found a place I will always be welcome. No matter what hurdles I face or where my career leads me, I always hold onto the fact that there is an agency of people in Dallas that I can call on for advice.

Until we meet again, GL!

-Ashley

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2017: The Year of Green

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2017: The Year of Green

As the final days of my internship with greenlight approach, it seems only fitting that Pantone’s 2017 Color of the Year is Greenery. For me, 2017 will, in fact, be something of a green year for me as I hit the ground running with the tools and insights into creative advertising and branding. My experience in the industry may still be green and just growing, but it will simply continue to grow as I make my mark throughout 2017.

“A refreshing and revitalizing shade, Greenery is symbolic of new beginnings…A life-affirming shade, Greenery is also emblematic of the pursuit of personal passions and vitality.”

Call me crazy, but it sounds a little bit like Pantone created this color just for me. When I started this journey with greenlight in September, I only just moved to Dallas. Transitioning to life in a state that is the polar opposite of my home state of Pennsylvania was less than glamorous and more than intimidating. Fresh out of college, eager to enter an ad agency and start changing the world, I quickly learned life’s big moments happen a little slower than you imagine they will.

Nevertheless, no matter how slowly life is moving you must keep going. When I was welcomed into the greenlight family, I absorbed so much, not just about agency life, but also about what I truly want for my own professional future. greenlight has been my refreshing and revitalizing introduction to Dallas life, leaving me more than prepared to set off on my pursuit of personal passions and vitality.

I’m certain that for the rest of my career, I won’t be able to see green without being reminded of these few months. In an agency, and in life, no matter what clients (or life) throw at you, it is so crucial that you just keep going – Every red light is followed by a green one, and as sad as I am to see the red light come up on my time at greenlight, I will continue my pursuit of an advertising career. Such is the life of an intern. But if there’s one thing I take with me everywhere I go, it’s the greenlight mantra: go go go.

Here’s to staying green in 2017!

-Ashley

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A Goodbye to greenlight

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A Goodbye to greenlight

I'd be naive to think I understand everything in the agency world that greenlight exists in, yet in the short amount of time I've been able to work with this company I feel as though I have firmly grasped a much deeper understanding of how this industry truly works, and I owe it all to gl.

So here's an intern's take on the industry must-knows before entering it full time:

1. Know What A Press Check Is. I'd never really been a part of the printing process before. As a student, I've gotten to tour printing facilities but I was unaware of the relationship between the printer and designer that underlies everything. With greenlight, I've been able to attend various press checks and see the struggles of color matching, "slitter dust", and the successes of a perfect print. Being exposed to this aspect has been incredibly valuable. I’ve learned what you can and cannot do when it comes to beginning the creative process. I've observed first-hand how important communication and precision is in this aspect. When the proof gets sent to the client and they sign off on it, nothing can be compromised or looked over. Press check after press check will happen until the product looks as promised. Which leads us to number two...

2. Relationships Are Key. The relationship a company has outside and within the office is so important. Knowing your clients and printers on a personal level lends itself to a smooth path to completion. When the two parties involved mutually respect each other, it makes the communication process much easier and the work much more enjoyable. I've been able to witness the attention greenlight gives not only to its client’s projects, but also to the individual. Being able to sit in on meetings and press checks without knowing the prior relationship formed with clients and see the kind of knowledge they have of each other within and outside of the workplace speaks volumes about the kind of time and attention that is required to have successful relationships with those in your industry.

3. Propose A Solution Outside Of The Box. Because of the in depth relationships an agency can have with a client, it's important to give the client what they ask for and make sure they know that they're being listened to. But as a creative, sometimes we have a vision that we want to execute and propose to the client as well. Working with Hotel Derek's business card redesign, I was able to complete what they'd asked for but was also encouraged by coworkers to push alternative executions. When it came down to the presentation, the client was drawn more towards the alternative than what she had originally proposed. As long as you can stick with the brand standards and guidelines, I've learned that you show creative conception and execution through going above and beyond what the ask is as long as you can give them a well-executed version of what they originally wanted.

4. Never Assume That You Know Everything. Internships are similar to school in that they are both a learning experience. Both have an end date and when you’re done with either, you assume that you’ll know all there is to know. But this industry is ever changing. There is only so much you can learn in school based on your curriculum, but having access to the industry teaches you the intangible aspect of the real world. There are very few constants and you’ve got to be willing to always be learning if you want to succeed. The people in this office are incredibly successful based on the fact that they are always willing to do just that. They never assume that they know all that they can know, or that they will create the best solution the first time around.

5. Work Somewhere That Makes You Happy. While I've been at greenlight, the one thing that is incredibly obvious is that the people who work here genuinely want to be here everyday. Everyone is continuously in high spirits and positive about the creative process. Tight deadlines and printing errors are simply not enough to discourage staff. This positivity makes for an incredibly open environment where creative ideas can be tossed around until execution.

The past 3 months of this internship have flown by, but I cannot express how much I’ve enjoyed my time here. The endless devotion to greenlight these people have is incredibly inspiring and I now understand exactly how a successful creative agency should work. I leave here everyday inspired by the people around me and get to come back each time more and more eager to learn, observe, and design. I’m incredibly grateful to greenlight for all I have learned, and that they gave me the opportunity to work with them this semester.

Until next time, gl fam.

-randie

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Paradise City: The greenlight Open House Party

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Paradise City: The greenlight Open House Party

Things to add to my resume: I survived my first ad agency party, courtesy of the greenlight open house, and if any agency knows how to throw a party, it’s greenlight.

With dancing, drinking, eating, and not to mention the best photo booth experience I’m sure any of us have ever had, greenlight continues to add to the list of ways any future office I work in will fall short of what I am experiencing here. Not that I’m worried, though, considering how many previous employees and interns were welcomed last night with hugs and screams of excitement. Every attendee, for that matter, seemed to have some incredible story to tell about his or her laughter-filled adventures with greenlight.

As I enter the final month and a half of my internship, I am more than ready to find out what stories I will be telling when I return to greenlight in the future for yet another incredible party. Especially if all of them are followed by breakfast tacos and leftover desserts in the break room in the next morning.

-Ashley

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